Explained: Bappi Lahiri dies of Obstructive Sleep Apnea; What is sleep apnea? Symptoms and risk factors

India

oi-Madhuri Adnal

|

Google Oneindia News


New
Delhi,
Feb
16
:
Veteran
singer
Bappi
Lahiri
passed
away
in
Mumbai,
today.
He
was
69.
The
singer-composer
popularised
disco
music
in
India
in
the
80s
and
90s.
According
to
report,
the
singer
died
due
to
obstructive
sleep
apnea.

 Explained: What is Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

“Lahiri
had
been
admitted
to
the
hospital
for
a
month
and
was
discharged
on
Monday.
But
his
health
deteriorated
on
Tuesday
and
his
family
called
for
a
doctor
to
visit
their
home.
He
was
brought
to
the
hospital.
He
had
multiple
health
issues.
He
died
due
to
OSA
(obstructive
sleep
apnea)
shortly
before
midnight,”
Dr
Deepak
Namjoshi,
director
of
the
hospital,
told
PTI.

What
is
Obstructive
Sleep
Apnea?

Obstructive
sleep
apnea
(OSA)
is
the
most
common
sleep-related
breathing
disorder
and
is
characterized
by
recurrent
episodes
of
complete
or
partial
obstruction
of
the
upper
airway
leading
to
reduced
or
absent
breathing
during
sleep.

These
episodes
are
termed
“apneas”
with
complete
or
near-complete
cessation
of
breathing,
or
“hypopneas”
when
the
reduction
in
breathing
is
partial.

In
either
case,
a
fall
in
blood
oxygen
saturation,
a
disruption
in
sleep,
or
both
may
result.
A
high
frequency
of
apneas
or
hypopneas
during
sleep
may
interfere
with
restorative
sleep,
which-in
combination
with
disturbances
in
blood
oxygenation-is
thought
to
contribute
to
negative
consequences
to
health
and
quality
of
life.

The
terms
obstructive
sleep
apnea
syndrome
(OSAS)
or
obstructive
sleep
apnea-hypopnea
syndrome
(OSAHS)
may
be
used
to
refer
to
OSA
when
it
is
associated
with
symptoms
during
the
daytime
(e.g.
excessive
daytime
sleepiness,
decreased
cognitive
function).

Who
gets
sleep
apnea?

Sleep
apnea
occurs
in
about
25%
of
men
and
nearly
10%
of
women.
Sleep
apnea
can
affect
people
of
all
ages,
including
babies
and
children
and
particularly
people
over
the
age
of
50
and
those
who
are
overweight.

What
are
the
symptoms
of
Obstructive
Sleep
Apnea?

Common
obstructive
sleep
apnea
warning
signs
include:

Daytime
sleepiness
or
fatigue
Dry
mouth
or
sore
throat
when
you
wake
up
Headaches
in
the
morning
Trouble
concentrating,
forgetfulness,
depression,
or
crankiness
Night
sweats
Restlessness
during
sleep
Problems
with
sex,
like
a
low
sex
drive
Snoring
Waking
up
suddenly
and
feeling
like
you’re
gasping
or
choking
Trouble
getting
up
in
the
mornings
Waking
up
often
in
the
middle
of
the
night
to
pee
High
blood
pressure
Gastroesophageal
reflux
disease
(GERD)
If
you
share
a
bed
with
someone,
they’ll
probably
notice
your
sleep
apnea
before
you
do.

Symptoms
in
children
may
not
be
as
clear.
They
may
include:

Bed-wetting
Choking
or
drooling
Sweating
a
lot
at
night
Ribcage
moves
inward
when
they
breathe
out
Learning
and
behavior
problems
Problems
at
school
Sluggishness
or
sleepiness
(often
seen
as
laziness)
Snoring
Teeth
grinding
Restlessness
in
bed
Breathing
that
pauses
or
stops
Unusual
sleeping
positions,
such
as
sleeping
on
their
hands
and
knees,
or
with
their
neck
bent
far
back

Risk
Factors

Anyone
can
have
obstructive
sleep
apnea.
It’s
more
likely
if
you:

Are
male
Are
older
Are
black,
Hispanic,
or
Native
American
Have
a
family
history
of
sleep
apnea
Have
asthma
Smoke
Have
diabetes
Have
high
blood
pressure
Have
a
higher
risk
of
heart
failure
or
stroke
Are
overweight
or
obese
Have
a
large
or
thick
neck
Have
smaller
airways
in
your
nose,
throat,
or
mouth
Have
too
much
tissue
at
the
back
of
your
throat
that
hangs
down
to
block
your
airway
Have
a
large
tongue

Obstructive
Sleep
Apnea
Treatment

  • Possible
    treatment
    options
    for
    obstructive
    sleep
    apnea
    include:
  • Weight
    loss,
    if
    needed.
    Losing
    even
    10%
    of
    your
    weight
    can
    make
    a
    difference.Not
    drinking
    alcohol
    or
    taking
    sleeping
    pills.
    These
    make
    your
    airway
    more
    likely
    to
    close
    during
    sleep
    and
    keep
    you
    from
    breathing
    like
    you
    should
    for
    longer
    periods.
  • Sleeping
    on
    your
    side.
    This
    can
    help
    if
    you
    get
    mild
    sleep
    apnea
    only
    when
    you
    sleep
    on
    your
    back.
  • Nasal
    sprays.
    These
    can
    help
    if
    sinus
    problems
    or
    nasal
    congestion
    make
    it
    harder
    to
    breathe
    while
    you
    sleep.

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